Matt Noveskey

Owner/Producer

Michigan-born bassist Matt Noveskey was basically tagging along when a music-biz friend working with rock band Blue October invited him on a trip to Austin, but he dropped his preconceived notions of Texas and fell in love the minute he stepped off the plane and within two weeks, he was back — as a permanent resident and Blue October member.

That was in 1999. Noveskey soon formed a brotherlike bond with Blue October guitarist C.B. Hudson and as the band’s experience and fame grew, the two learned their way around many recording studios, working with producers such as Steve Lillywhite, Tim Palmer, Interscope’s Chuck Reed, Dave Castell, Patrick Leonard and Blue Miller. They also whiled away countless tour hours fantasizing about their dream studio. Meanwhile, Noveskey evolved into a sought-after producer and manager, fostering the careers of young artists and helping them reach higher levels of achievement and success. Hudson couldn’t help but notice.


Read More About Matt

More About Matt

Michigan-born bassist Matt Noveskey was basically tagging along when a music-biz friend working with rock band Blue October invited him on a trip to Austin. But he dropped his preconceived notions of Texas and fell in love the minute he stepped off the plane, and within two weeks, he was back — as a permanent resident and Blue October member.

That was in 1999. Noveskey soon formed a brotherlike bond with Blue October guitarist C.B. Hudson, and as the band’s experience and fame grew, the two learned their way around many recording studios, working with producers such as Steve Lillywhite, Tim Palmer, Interscope’s Chuck Reed, Dave Castell, Patrick Leonard and Blue Miller. They also whiled away countless tour hours fantasizing about their dream studio. Meanwhile, Noveskey evolved into a sought-after producer and manager, fostering the careers of young artists and helping them reach higher levels of achievement and success. Hudson couldn’t help but notice.

“He saw that every time we came home, I was working. I would go right back into the studio,” Noveskey explains. “One thing led to another, and we just came up with a plan together.”

That plan, now realized as Orb Recording Studios, reaches far beyond the mere brick and mortar of a recording space, Noveskey says.

“I also have this grand image — it goes back to the very first day we even started talking about the concept of the studio — which is development,” says Noveskey, now married and a father of two. “I want to get back to the same ideals and philosophies that Barry Gordy started at Motown. I want to have writers and artists we can go to in our own backyard, a community of producers and musicians. It’s part of a family, not competition.”

Noveskey’s Midwestern-bred sense of loyalty is strong, and one of his goals for Orb is to help launch new artists who will choose to return no matter how famous they become. He knows Orb will earn that loyalty by caring for clients and offering them every resource in the studio’s extensive arsenal.

“I view myself as a fundamental producer,” he says. “I’ve worked with a bunch of artists that were really unknown when I got together with them. The thing I’m most proud of is being able to take the training wheels off these artists and watch them go on to bigger and better things.”

Noveskey’s first major-label experience was Blue October’s 2000 Universal Records debut, Consent to Treatment; he also did the album art and co-authored “James” with bandmate Justin Furstenfeld. Another Noveskey composition, “You Make Me Smile,” became wildly popular, but the band stopped playing it when he took a health-related two-year leave of absence in late 2002.

In 2002, he began working with acts such as IAMDYNAMITE and started to envision a future in production. His ever expanding resume includes an impressive roster of genre-bending artists, such as IAMDYNAMITE, Alpha Rev, CAVO, Daryl “DMC” McDaniels, Quiet Company, Waterloo Revival and Joshua Radin. He’s also crossed project paths with notable recording and mixing engineers such as Jay Ruston, Adam Hawkins, Greg Archilla, Chuck Alkazian and Sterling Winfield. In just a relatively short time producing other acts, Matt has independently achieved some of the following benchmarks:

#1 iTunes independent (producer)
#1 iHeartRadio Alternative (producer/co-writer)
Top 10 iTunes pop (producer/co-writer)
Top 20 iTunes overall (producer/ co-writer)
Top 30 on Alternative US charts (producer)
Top 40 on HOT AC US charts (producer)
Top 30 Texas Country charts (producer/co-writer)

“I always joke, you know, ‘how do producers pick their field?’” Noveskey remarks. “It’s not like you wake up one day and you’re like, ‘Today I’m a record producer.’ You just have to keep plugging away until something happens and then people start to approach you, instead of you going out and hustling for work.

“I’m a song guy,” he continues. “I’ve always been that guy who hears the structure. When we worked with our first couple of producers, I was like, ‘This guy’s doing what I already do in the band.’ I loved watching him work — we worked with Nick Launay on our first record — and it had such a profound impact on me because I realized this is something I could do for the rest of my life, and be so happy. Before then, I didn’t really know what a producer did.”

Each lesson became a building block used to create Orb’s environment, which, Noveskey says, is the sum of “little things that C.B. and I loved about each place we worked.”

One critical element, they agreed, is multiple recording rooms, “not just one room where you’re stuck with one sort of vibe.”

Another is a space built specifically for recording, not converted from another use. Clean, comfortable areas to spread out and relax are also vital. But there are intangibles as well.

“This studio is all about the experience,” Noveskey explains. “The most important thing about a studio is not to have a sense of arrogance. The things I remember about the best studios have just as much to do with the interns and the people there you had conversations with as the space.

“We’re just trying to be a place that people feel good about, and want to come back to.”